social security disability attorney

Social Security Common Conditions: Anemia Disability

by Staff | October 29th, 2014

What Is Anemia?

Anemia is a condition that affects the lives of approximately 3.5 million Americans each day. It’s caused by the body’s inability to produce enough red blood cells, or hemoglobin, which is vital to the transfer of oxygen from the lungs to organs and tissues. Symptoms can include weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat, and numbness in the limbs. An anemia disability can be caused by a number of conditions, which is why there are several different types of the disease.

Common Types of Anemia

Most cases of Anemia can be classified into one of three categories, including:

  • Blood Loss Anemia– Anemia can develop when large amounts of blood are loss due to an injury, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or even pregnancy.
  • Decreased Cell Production– The bodies of many who are afflicted with anemia simply cannot make enough red blood cells. Most often, this is the result of an inherited condition, known as sickle cell anemia, or a deficiency in vitamins such as iron.
  • Destroyed Red Blood Cells– The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute say hemolytic anemia occurs when blood cells prematurely burst. Toxins in the body, infection, an enlarged spleen, or even inherited conditions can cause this.

Help Is Available

If you’re anemic and are unable to work because of the illness, you’re condition may qualify as an anemia disability. If this is the case, you may qualify for Social Security Disability benefits. However, proving your condition to the Social Security Administration can be difficult. That’s why it may be wise to discuss your case with a Social Security Disability attorney.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we have helped many disabled citizens get the benefits they deserve and are here to help you as well. To learn more about how we can assist you, give our legal team a call at (800) 477-7315.

Social Security Common Conditions: Anemia

by Staff | October 29th, 2014

What Is Anemia?

Anemia is a condition that affects the lives of approximately 3.5 million Americans each day. It’s caused by the body’s inability to produce enough red blood cells, or hemoglobin, which is vital to the transfer of oxygen from the lungs to organs and tissues. Symptoms can include weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat, and numbness in the limbs. An anemia disability can be caused by a number of conditions, which is why there are several different types of the disease.

Common Types of Anemia

Most cases of Anemia can be classified into one of three categories, including:

  • Blood Loss Anemia– Anemia can develop when large amounts of blood are loss due to an injury, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or even pregnancy.
  • Decreased Cell Production– The bodies of many who are afflicted with anemia simply cannot make enough red blood cells. Most often, this is the result of an inherited condition, known as sickle cell anemia, or a deficiency in vitamins such as iron.
  • Destroyed Red Blood Cells– The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute say hemolytic anemia occurs when blood cells prematurely burst. Toxins in the body, infection, an enlarged spleen, or even inherited conditions can cause this.

Help Is Available

If you’re anemic and are unable to work because of the illness, you’re condition may qualify as an anemia disability. If this is the case, you may qualify for Social Security Disability benefits. However, proving your condition to the Social Security Administration can be difficult. That’s why it may be wise to discuss your case with a Social Security Disability attorney.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we have helped many disabled citizens get the benefits they deserve and are here to help you as well. To learn more about how we can assist you, give our legal team a call at (866) 68

Estimate for 2015 Social Security Disability COLA Released

by Staff | October 20th, 2014

Making ends meet can be a struggle those who receive Social Security Disability benefits. Ricipients must meet strict income limits that prevent savings from being accumulated to be eligible for Disability benefit payments. These financial concerns can be compounded by inflation rates that drive up the cost of goods and services.

What is A COLA?

To combat the latter problem, the Social Security Administration reevaluates how disability payments are structured each year to determine if increases or decreases in payouts are needed. This is often referred to as a Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA).

COLAs use a complex equation to figure the amount of benefits each disability recipient should receive based on the costs of certain items and services necessary for everyday life, including food, fuel, transportation, electricity, and housing.

What Will Next Year’s COLA Be?

Officials say that as long as costs are stable throughout the remainder of the year, disability recipients should expect to see a small increase in benefit payments beginning in Jan. 2015. According to an article from FedSmith.com, current estimates are showing next year’s COLA to be around a 1.7 percent increase in payments.

What Can You Do To Increase Benefits?

These numbers seem small, but there are some things you can do that could potentially increase the amount of benefits you receive. They include:

  • Checking Benefit Statements– Mistakes are sometimes made in paperwork, and the Social Security Administration is no exception. This is why it’s vital to check benefit statements online or when they come in the mail to ensure your earned income is correct. An error with this number could significantly affect the amount of benefits you receive.
  • Apply for Other Income Resources– If you receive Social Security Disability, you may also qualify for other benefits programs.
  • Join Ticket To Work– The Ticket To Work program can help you transition back into a job after being disabled, while still being able to collect benefits for a disability.

Are My Social Security Disability Benefits Taxable?

by Staff | July 23rd, 2014

Many disabled Americans who receive Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits have a hard time stretching their assistance far enough to make ends meet. One of the reasons behind this problem is that the federal government taxes SSD benefits, which takes away crucial dollars from people who need help the most.

An article from Forbes magazine explains the regulations overseeing the taxation of Social Security Disability benefits can be so complicated that even tax professionals have a hard time understanding the rules. To help people with disabilities better understand Social Security Disability tax laws, we will take a look at how much your benefits can be taxed and what you can do to ensure you have enough benefits to cover your everyday expenses.

Federal law states that as much as 85 percent of income from Social Security Disability benefits can be taxed. Furthermore, certain penalties can apply that significantly increase the amount disabled individuals owe to the Internal Revenue Service.

So what should you do to help reduce the amount you are taxed on your SSD benefits? The article suggests discussing your financial situation with a certified professional accountant. It may also prove beneficial to have a Social Security Disability attorney by your side when applying for benefits to help ensure you get the maximum amount of benefits you’re owed.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we help people get the disability benefits they need. Call us anytime at (866) 684-7216 to discuss your case with our legal staff.

3 Reasons for Social Security Disability Denials

by Staff | July 21st, 2014

The Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as many as 60 percent of initial claims are denied. This leaves many applicants wondering what some of the common reasons for Social Security Disability (SSD) denials are, and what can be done to avoid such pitfalls.

Three reasons the SSA denies SSD claims include:

    1. Incomplete Paperwork- Missing pieces of information—such as claims forms—can lead to claims being denied.
    2. Missing Deadlines- There are statutes of limitations for taking certain actions or submitting certain documents. Missing these time frames may lead to a claim not being approved.
    3. Lack of Documentation- The SSA may need more information from doctor’s notes, patient medical files, or work history in order to approve a claim.

      Applicants may be able to overcome these obstacles through the Social Security Disability appeals system. There are four different levels  appeals can go through. A Motley Fool video explains that while much of the appeals process can be completed online, it may be wise to seek advice from a qualified attorney.

      At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, our knowledgeable team of lawyers can help you get the benefits you deserve. Call us today at (866) 684-7216 to discuss your SSD claim.

      How to Determine Your Social Security Disability Eligibility

      by Staff | July 14th, 2014

      There are many struggles you may face if you’re unable to work because of an injury or illness, but one of the most difficult hurdles to overcome is getting financial support to cover your day-to-day expenses. Luckily, programs like Social Security Disability (SSD) are available for many suffering from disabilities. However, you may have questions about qualifying for SSD benefits.

      The Social Security Administration (SSA) determines Social Security Disability eligibility by asking three questions:

      • Can you do the work you did prior to accident or illness?
      • Is there other work you are capable of doing?
      • Will your condition last longer than on-year?

      Depending on your answers to these questions, you may qualify for SSD benefits, but there are other factors that must be considered before your benefit claim will be approved. An informative video from Daily Finance explains two of these factors:

      • Wages– The SSA determines whether you make enough money to cover your own expenses. If not, you make qualify for benefits. It’s important to remember you can continue earning a small income while still receiving SSD through programs such as Ticket to Work.
      • Your Condition– Depending on the injury or illness you’re suffering from, you may automatically qualify for benefits through Compassionate Allowances.

      Having a Social Security Disability attorney by your side can prove beneficial when applying for SSD benefits. At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we are here to help you answer any questions you may have if you are considering applying for SSD benefits, or if you have a claim that’s been denied in the past. Call anytime for a free consultation of your case.

      What You Don’t Know About Social Security Benefits Can Affect Your Claim

      by Staff | June 23rd, 2014

      A portion of most workers’ paychecks go towards their Social Security benefits. But while millions of Americans are paying into this program, very few understand the policies that regulate it. Knowing the subtleties of these rules can add hundreds of dollars per month in benefits.

      An article from The Wall Street Journal explains there are several things about the Social Security program that can have serious effects on many Americans’ ability to collect Social Security benefits. One of the biggest problems with the program is its complexity. In fact, the Social Security Administration’s handbook states there is too much information for them to include it all in the publication.

      Other areas of concern within the Social Security program are their current lack of manpower available to process the growing number of claims and appeals.

      Each of these issues plays a significant role in Social Security workers’ inability to provide applicants with guidance and direction about how to get the maximum benefits available.

      At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, our Social Security Disability Attorneys can help you understand the steps to to file a successful Social Security claim. So call us anytime to discuss your claim.

      Social Security Commission Proposed to Solve Program Issues

      by Staff | June 2nd, 2014

      Most Americans depend on the Social Security system as a resource for income and assistance if they become disabled. But budget shortfalls and a growing number of recipients have placed a strain on the Social Security Disability program.

      To help address these issues, legislators have proposed creating a Social Security committee that will work to create solutions to the program’s problems. The proposal plans to achieve this by having a 13-member panel investigate the shortcomings of the program and create a list of suggestions that would remedy each issue.

      The Washington Post states the goal is to create a 75-year sustained longevity for both Social Security Disability benefits and retirement benefits.

      Solutions to Social Security insolvency have been proposed in the past but have received the cold shoulder from lawmakers. The most recent proposed changes came in 2010, which included:

      • Raising the taxable income amount to 90 percent
      • Slowing down cost-of-living-adjustments (COLAs)
      • Increasing the retirement age

      Our Social Security Disability attorneys at the law firm of Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin are here to help if you are considering applying for benefits or have a claim that has been denied in the past.

      Amount Of Time Worked Significantly Affects Social Security Disability Claims

      by Staff | August 22nd, 2013

      August 19, 2013

      For those who are unable to work because of a mental or physical condition, Social Security Disability Benefits may be an only option as a source of income; however, many citizens do not understand the complexities associated with qualifying for the program.

      One of the greatest misconceptions about Social Security Disability is that if an individual is working, they automatically will qualify for benefits if they are injured on-the-job. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth though.

      The Social Security Administration requires that an individual work long enough to pay into the system before pulling benefits from it. An individual’s eligibility for Social Security is actually based off the number of credits they earn for time worked.

      For instance, if a worker is hurt in the quarter before they turn 24-years-old, they typically must work for a year and a half during the three-year-period prior to becoming disabled. After the age of 24, the individual must typically have worked at least half of the time.

      If an injured worker believes they may qualify for benefits, they should immediately begin the application process because of the amount of time it takes to process a claim.

      The Social Security Disability Lawyers at the law firm of Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin recognize how difficult the application process for Social Security Disability benefits can be to understand. The firm is here to help anyone who is unable to work get the compensation they need.

      Applying Online For Social Security Disability Benefits

      by Staff | August 7th, 2013

      August 7, 2013

      Each year, millions of Americans are left unable to work due to a debilitating mental or physical condition. This often leaves these individuals struggling to make ends meet and dependent on others for a source of income.

      Luckily, the federal government’s Social Security Administration (SSA) has a program that offers Social Security Disability Benefits to these needy individuals; however, in order to receive these benefits, a disabled person must first apply.

      In the past, this meant the disabled person had to leave their home and visit a local SSA office in order to fill out the required application; however, the agency recently introduced a new program that allows citizens to apply for benefits online. According to an article from Frost Illustrated, the new digital application system is working to speed up the claims process by filtering claims into appropriate expediting programs. For example, an individual suffering from a condition listed as one of the hundreds of the SSA’s Compassionate Allowances eligible diseases can have their claim processed much quicker than the average claim. The Quick Disability Determination program is also working to cut wait times for claimants by streamlining the application and approval process.

      The Social Security Disability Attorneys with Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin recognize the complexities of the Social Security Disability application process. The firm urges anyone considering applying for benefits to first discuss their legal options with a qualified attorney to help ensure they get the compensation they deserve.