Social Security Disability Rules

Bill Helps Prevent Criminals from Receiving Supplemental Security Income or Disability Benefits

by Staff | July 27th, 2015

The law states that anyone who is fleeing to avoid prosecution of a felony is ineligible to receive Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income; however, loopholes in the law that were uncovered by several recent court cases have allowed some who are fleeing prosecution to continue receiving benefits.

To help address the issue, an Indiana senator has proposed a bill that would change the language of the law in order to prevent many individuals with warrants for their arrest from receiving federal assistance.

The Social Security Act, as it stands today, states that federal benefits cannot be paid to anyone fleeing a felony arrest or conviction. Furthermore, anyone who violates the conditions of their parole or probation for a felony conviction is ineligible for Social Security programs.

Several recent cases have allowed individuals fitting these circumstances to continue receiving payments though. That’s why the bill introduced by Sen. Dan Coats would change the wording of the law to close these loopholes.

According to The Journal Gazette, the bill proposed by Sen. Coats would prevent anyone who is “the subject of an arrest warrant for the purpose of prosecution” to be prohibited from receiving benefits. The only stipulation to the rule is that the arrest warrant or violation must be for a felony.

Coats estimates that, if approved, his bill could save taxpayers as much as $4.8 billion over the course of the next decade.

Protecting the rights and benefits of the disabled is important to our Social Security Disability lawyers at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, and we know that Social Security regulations can be complex. Our legal staff is curious to see if Sen. Coats bill will be adopted or rejected and what effect it may have on those who receive disability payments.

Proposed Changes to Grid Rules Could Affect How the SSA Determines if You’re Disabled

by Staff | June 1st, 2015

Being unable to work would put a serious financial strain on a majority of Americans. Luckily, most employees in the United States pay into the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) disability program in order to qualify for benefits in the event they are unable to work; however, getting these benefits can be an extremely complicated process.

One of the reasons for this is how the SSA determines if you’re disabled. The agency uses a set of grid rules that examine factors of an applicant’s condition that can affect their quality of life. If the condition is determined to be detrimental to the applicant’s ability to lead a normal work and private life, they may be approved; however, these rules haven’t been updated for decades despite massive advancements in the fields of treatment, technology, and education during that time.

That’s why lawmakers are considering three separate bills that would reform how the SSA determines if you’re disabled. An article from The Ripon Advance outlines the details of each of the bills that have been sponsored by Senate Finance Committee Chairman, Sen. Orrin Hatch. Hatch states he hopes the changes will create a much more “effective and efficient” process for distributing disability benefits.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we’ve seen many disabled workers struggle to get the benefits they deserve. That’s why our Social Security Disability lawyers are optimistic that these laws will benefit those who have fought for so long to get the help that they need.

Social Security Common Conditions: Kidney Disease

by Staff | November 12th, 2014

The body needs to be able to excrete waste in order to properly function. If this cannot be achieved, it can lead to an individual developing any of several conditions—including kidney disease.

What Is Kidney Disease?

The kidneys are the organs in the body that are responsible for helping filter the fluids and blood in the body. If these organs fail, deadly toxins can build up, which can lead to patients being unable to work and in need of extensive medical treatment. If not treated, it can eventually cause death.

What Help Is Available to Those with Kidney Disease?

To help with the expenses associated with costly medical bills and lost wages, the Social Security Administration considers kidney disease to be a condition that may qualify a person for Social Security Disability benefits; however, it’s important to understand the rules associated with Social Security Disability eligibility as it pertains to this particular condition, especially since the rules recently changed.

What Are Social Security’s Eligibility Rules for Those with Kidney Disease?

Officials recently altered the wording of the law to provide more clarification as to what determines when a genitourinary disorder is considered to be “frequent” or “interferes” with another aspect of daily life. Furthermore, the documentation requirements for hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were updated.

Let Us Assist You

These changes can bring up questions among many kidney disease sufferers regarding their legal rights to Social Security Disability benefits, and our team of attorneys at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin are here to help. To speak with one of our Social Security Disability attorneys about your case, call us at (800) 477-7315.

Social Security Common Conditions: Kidney Disease

by Staff | November 12th, 2014

The body needs to be able to excrete waste in order to properly function. If this cannot be achieved, it can lead to an individual developing any of several conditions—includingKidney disease.

What Is Kidney Disease?

The kidneys are the organs in the body that are responsible for helping to filter the fluids and blood in the body. If these organs fail, deadly toxins can build up, which can eventually cause death if not treated. This often leaves Kidney disease patients unable to work and in need of extensive medical treatment.

What Help Is Available To Those With Kidney Disease?

To help with the expenses associated with costly medical bills and lost wages, the Social Security Administration considers Kidney disease to be a condition that may qualify for Social Security Disability benefits; however, it’s important to understand the rules associated with Social Security Disability eligibility as it pertains to this particular condition, especially since they recently underwent changes.

What Are Social Security’s eligibility Rules For Those with Kidney Disease?

Officials recently altered the wording of the law to provide more clarification as to what determines when a genitourinary disorder is considered to be “frequent” or “interferes” with another aspect of daily life. Furthermore, the documentation requirements for hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were updated.

Let Us Assist You

These changes can bring up questions amongst many Kidney disease sufferers regarding their legal right to Social Security Disability benefits and our team of attorneys at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin are here to help. To speak with one of our Social Security Disability attorneys about your case, call us at (800) 477-7315.