Kentucky sisters go to court to get Social Security cards

by Staff | November 28th, 2011

Two sisters, who live in the tiny enclave of Lily, Kentucky, close to the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, will finally get Social Security numbers, according to the Washington Post.

After being turned away on multiple attempts at getting cards because of a lack of documentation proving their citizenship, the sisters sued in federal court in July, 2010.

The 29-year old sister was born at a home; the 23-year-old was delivered in the back of a Dodge van.  Their births were recorded in the family bible, but otherwise not documented.

The earliest years for the sisters were nomadic with the family traveling through 42 states, seeking employment.

The Social Security Administration website lists the documents that may be used to prove identity, age, and citizenship: a birth certificate, driver’s license, state-issued identification card, or U.S. passport.

The sisters sued in state court in 2009, seeking birth certificates. When DNA tests proved that the women were born to their parents, the records were issued.

“The court has no reason to not believe the testimony and finds no reason to suggest the plaintiffs are seeking this relief for an illegal or immoral purpose,” the Circuit Judge wrote in his 2010 order.

Read more.

Do you think that there may be others who have not yet gotten their Social Security numbers because of lack of documentation?

If you need help with your Social Security Disability benefits, contact the Social Security Disability lawyers at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin.

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