Determining social security disability benefits

Can a Medical Condition Automatically Qualify for Social Security Disability Benefits?

by Staff | October 12th, 2015

Millions of Americans suffer from medical conditions that leave them unable to work. Many qualify for Social Security Disability benefits, but the application process can be take time—some wait years for decisions to be reached on their claims. This leaves many wondering if there are any illnesses or medical conditions that receive automatic approval for Social Security Disability.

The Social Security Disability lawyers at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin explain that while no medical condition can be automatically approved for benefits, some conditions can qualify an individual to have their case expedited through the approval process.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has created a list of conditions, called Compassionate Allowances, which qualifies applicants for expedited claims processing. Veterans deemed 100 percent disabled by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs may also qualify for expedited processing of a Social Security Disability benefit claim.

While a condition may qualify a case for expedited processing, a five-month waiting period before benefits can be paid may apply.

Learning more about how the SSA determines if you’re disabled can help you to better understand if your ailment will qualify for expedited processing of your Social Security Disability benefits claim.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we believe in helping citizens get access to the benefits they have worked to receive. If you have questions about the benefits you may qualify for, we’re here to help.

 

Why Calculating SSDI Benefits on a Regular Basis Is Important

by Staff | August 4th, 2015

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits are calculated using the number of credits you earned while working and the amount of income you received during that time. But don’t be confused; calculating SSDI benefits can be complicated and mistakes are often made.

Take the case of a 65-year-old California woman who received the incorrect amount of benefits for 15 years. The mistake resulted her missing out on a total of $56,000 in benefits.

An article from ABC 7 News explains the woman suffered a disabling injury in a forklift accident in 1995. Her husband died of cancer five years later, which allowed her to receive survivor’s benefits in addition to her SSDI benefits; however, a mistake was made when calculating her benefits, which resulted in her not receiving an additional $450 per month.

The error was corrected, but it serves as a reminder of the importance of regularly checking your earned benefits so that you receive the compensation you’re entitled to. The Social Security Administration’s website provides a calculator that can help you determine your exact benefit total. Determining this total can help ensure you’re prepared in the event an accident or illness leaves you unable to work.

Even if you are tracking your earned annual benefits, mistakes still happen. That’s why our Social Security Disability lawyers at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin believe it’s so important to have a legal representative by your side throughout the SSDI application or appeals process.

Let our legal staff give you the assistance with your case that you deserve. Call us at (800) 477-7315 anytime to get answers to your questions.

How to Determine What Social Security Disability Benefits You’ve Earned

by Staff | June 22nd, 2015

Suffering from a disabling injury or illness can leave your finances tight. Luckily, many disabled Americans qualify for Social Security Disability benefits, but determining how much you should receive can be complicated.

Our Social Security Disability lawyers at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin say one of the best ways to find out how much you could receive from Social Security Disability benefits is to sign up for a My Social Security account. Doing so will allow you to see just how much in benefits you have earned during your working career and will also allow you to track how much you will earn in the future.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) says that’s not all you can do with your account. You can also request a replacement Medicare card if your original is lost or stolen. Having an account also allows you to retrieve extra copies of your tax documents, such as a SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S.

Speaking with a legal representative can also be beneficial in determining the amount of Social Security Disability benefits you can earn. An examination of your case and history can help determine the best way to get you the maximum amount of benefits.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we understand that figuring out how to calculate your Social Security Disability benefits can be complicated, which is why our legal staff hopes these tips help navigating through the process a little simpler for you.