Intellectual Disability

“I’m In To Hire” Creates Jobs For Those With An Intellectual Disability

by Staff | October 27th, 2014

Life With An Intellectual Disability

Living with an intellectual disability can be a struggle due to an inability to learn or meet established criteria for advancement in a school setting. This is just one reason why many of the individuals who make up the two percent of Americans who are afflicted with an intellectual disability depend on Social Security Disability benefits and Supplemental Security Income to make ends meet.

These benefits are often meager though and many of those with an intellectual disability have a desire to works; however, this type of disability often keeps employers from considering hiring someone who has been diagnosed with such a condition. That may soon change though if one organization has anything to do with it.

“I’m In To Hire” Program

The Best Buddies “I’m In To Hire” program challenges employers and companies across the United States to find work for and hire local citizens who are afflicted with an intellectual disability. The organization adds that it is a win-win for those involved, considering the disabled are able to earn a living wage—as much as $40,000 a year—while companies get dedicated, hard working employees. Th program also significantly reduces the amount of money needed to fund disability programs.

So far, more than 100,000 employers have pledged to participate in the program. Best Buddies hopes to reach a goal of getting one million disabled individuals employed within the next decade.

Get Involved

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, our Social Security Disability lawyers recognize the sense of pride and accomplishment that can go into a hard days work. That’s why we encourage you, if you’re an employer, to consider hiring one of the 85 percent of individuals with an intellectual disability who are unemployed for a job. Even if you aren’t an employer, we encourage you to pledge your support to the cause by signing up to raise awareness about the issue.

“I’m In To Hire” Creates Jobs for People With Intellectual Disabilities

by Staff | October 22nd, 2014

Life With An Intellectual Disability

Living with an intellectual disability can be a struggle due to an inability to learn or meet criteria for advancement in school settings. This is just one reason why many of the the two percent of Americans afflicted with intellectual disabilities depend on Social Security Disability benefits and Supplemental Security Income to make ends meet.

Many people with intellectual disabilities have a desire to enter the workforce, but it can be hard to find jobs. However, this may soon change if one organization has anything to do with it.

“I’m In To Hire” Program

The Best Buddies “I’m In To Hire” program challenges employers across the United States to  hire local citizens with intellectual disabilities. The organization adds that it is a win-win for those involved, considering the disabled are able to earn living wages—as much as $40,000 a year—while companies get dedicated, hard working employees. Th program also significantly reduces the amount of money needed to fund disability programs.

So far, more than 100,000 employers have pledged to participate in the program. Best Buddies hopes to reach a goal of getting one million disabled individuals employed within the next decade.

Get Involved

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, our Social Security Disability lawyers recognize the sense of pride and accomplishment that can go into a hard day’s work. That’s why we encourage employers to consider hiring one of the 85 percent of individuals with an intellectual disability who are without a job. If you aren’t an employer, we encourage you to pledge your support to the cause by signing up to raise awareness about the program.

Housing for People With Intellectual Disabilities Coming to Irvine

by Staff | July 7th, 2014

When people suffer from developmental or intellectual disabilities, life often has a very unique set of hurdles that must be overcome. The parents of many of these individuals often must ensure their disabled children can be cared for after they are gone. While Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income can provide some financial support, neither program supplies housing. Furthermore, the limits on income these programs establish can prevent those with intellectual disabilities from securing their own housing.

This is why the City of Irvine, California, has adopted a policy to create housing opportunities for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The OC Register explains the City Council recently approved a measure that requires developers to offer a certain number of units in any new housing project to those with intellectual disabilities at affordable prices. If developers wish to opt out, they must pay money towards the Irvine Community Land Trust.

Offering these units below market value allows disabled citizens the opportunity to secure a home while staying within the strict income limitations established by the Social Security Administration.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, our Social Security Disability Lawyers know how difficult it can be for a disabled individual to make ends meet. That’s why we commend the City of Irvine for making efforts to accommodate these citizens and hope other cities will follow in their footsteps.

Those Suffering From Intellectual Disabilities Struggle to Gain Employment

by Staff | May 9th, 2014

An estimated 2.5 million Americans today are living with intellectual disabilities. While some of these individuals receive Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits because of their condition, others strive to rejoin the workforce. But stigmas held by employers can make it hard for many to find work.

Mary Niland, the president and CEO of Witco, an organization dedicated to helping those with intellectual disabilities find gainful employment, believes many employers question the skills and abilities of applicants with intellectual disabilities. The perception a disabled worker will not be able to perform their job duties leaves many in this particular demographic without work.

An article from The Arbiter explains Boise State University has hired people with intellectual disabilities for certain positions to great success. Ivan Lybarger, the campus’ environment operations manager, says he gets fewer calls to the service desk today because his team is caught up on work, which is directly attributed to his team members with intellectual disabilities.

If you or someone you love have struggled to find employment due to your intellectual disability, the Social Security Disability lawyers with Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin explain there are programs to help. Services such as Ticket To Work and organizations like Witco are available to get the education, training, and support needed to find gainful employment.

Social Security Disability Conditions: Intellectual Disabilities

by Staff | March 28th, 2014

March 28, 2014

People who suffer from conditions that prevent them from working can apply for Social Security Disability benefits. But a growing number of claims are being filed for individuals suffering from Intellectual Disabilities, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

The increase in the number of claims associated with the condition can be attributed to a growing number of diagnoses. The Daily Beast reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state 1 in 68 United States children are diagnosed with ASD each year. The estimate is as much as 30 percent higher than the total number of cases reported in 2012.

Experts believe the reason for the increase in ASD diagnosis isn’t necessarily that there are more individuals suffering from the disease. Instead, they believe an increased awareness of the condition, combined with certain changes made to the diagnosis protocol of the disease, are the main contributing factors.

A spokesperson for the Autism Science Foundation, Alison Singer, believes that while more awareness of the disease could be seen as a good thing, it could have a negative impact on the resources and services available to these individuals as public opinion on the serious nature of the condition changes.

That is why the Social Security Disability Lawyers with Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin say it is important to discuss your legal rights with a qualified attorney if you or a loved one have been diagnosed with ASD.

Social Security Administration Eliminates Use Of the Term “Mental Retardation”

by Staff | August 13th, 2013

August 5, 2013

Mental health conditions are one of the leading reasons people file claims for Social Security Disability benefits today. Determining if a person’s mental health condition qualifies for such benefits can be affected by how the Social Security Administration (SSA) categorizes the condition. Furthermore, the wording of what conditions are eligible can have a significant impact on whether a claimant’s application is approved or denied.

In an effort to create a more clearly defined category for certain mental conditions, the SSA has eliminated the use of the term “Mental Retardation” from their vocabulary and have replaced the term with “intellectual disability”. According to an article published by the Austin Daily Herald, the move comes just three years after the passage of Rosa’s Law, which prohibited the use of the term in all federal statutes.

The SSA has clearly stated that the change will have no effect on the benefits an individual who was approved under the old term receives or on the approval of new claims.

The move is being considered noteworthy because the change came voluntarily and was not forced under Rosa’s Law.

The Social Security Disability Attorneys with Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin are hopeful the change will be conducive to a better service by the agency to those who are most in need.