Terre Haute Brain Injury Lawyer

Terre Haute Brain Injury Lawyers Discuss New Law That Would Change Athletic Policies

by Staff | March 20th, 2015

March has been named Brain Injury Awareness Month across the United States. So, our Terre Haute brain injury lawyers at Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin would like to do our part to contribute to the cause by discussing one of the most common contributing factors in brain injuries among children and adolescents—athletics.

Thousands of sports-related brain injuries are reported each year, but officials are working to reduce these numbers by creating stringent legal policies regarding this type of injury. They plan to educate athletes and coaches about the causes, signs, and symptoms of a brain injury, as well as govern when injured players should be allowed to return to play.

The Times reports Indiana Senate Bill 403 is expected to take effect on July 1, 2016, and will require all athletes in grades 5-12 to complete a concussion safety and awareness course before they will be allowed to take to the field. Football coaches will also be required to undergo further education regarding heat-related illness, proper equipment fit, and practicing proper tackling and hitting techniques.

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we recognize the long-term damage that can be caused by a brain injury suffered by a child or teen. That’s why our Terre Haute personal injury lawyers applaud this new law being considered by our state’s legislators and we are hopeful it passes during the upcoming legislative session.

What Effects Do Helmets Have on Risk of Traumatic Brain Injuries?

by Staff | October 15th, 2014

The Brain Injury Association of America estimates that 1.4 million citizens of the United States will suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) this year. One of the best ways to prevent this type of injury is to wear a helmet when engaging in risky activity, such as riding a bike or playing contact sports. But it’s important to remember a helmet is only capable of protecting the head if it is designed and worn properly.

All Helmets Aren’t Equal

There are many factors that go into the effectiveness of a particular helmet, including the materials and structure of the equipment. That’s why the United States requires helmets to meet rigorous safety standards. These policies regulate not only the amount of force of impact the helmet should be able to sustain, but also what part of the head the helmet should cover. Any alterations made to a helmet may result in a traumatic brain injury in the event of an accident.

Did An Altered Helmet Cause One Man’s TBI?

An article from the International Business Times states experts believe the failure of a helmet that was modified and fitted with a camera may be to blame for the TBI that was suffered by Formula One driver, Michael Schumacher, during a skiing accident earlier this year. Reports indicate the helmet was heavily damaged in the crash, while the camera escaped unscathed.

What You Can Do To Stay Safe

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we recognize the impact helmets have on reducing the number of serious traumatic brain injuries that occur each year. That’s why we would like to offer these tips to ensure the proper use of this life-saving piece of equipment:

  • Only Use Approved Helmets- All motorcycle helmets should be approved by the Department of Transportation and should be marked with a DOT-Approved sticker. The Consumer Product Safety Commission regulates the safety of helmets used for bicycling, skiing, etc.
  • Ensure Proper Fit- Most helmets should sit across the middle of the forehead. The Chinstrap should secure snuggly beneath the jaw, leaving the helmet with little room for movement.
  • Don’t Compromise Integrity– Altering or modifying a helmet can create a risk of device failure and should be avoided.

Our team of Terre Haute personal injury lawyers is hopeful these tips will help to keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

What Effects Do Helmets Have on Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury?

by Staff | October 15th, 2014

The Brain Injury Association of America estimates that 1.4 million citizens of the United States will suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) this year. One of the best ways to prevent this type of injury is to wear a helmet when engaging in risky activity, such as riding a bike or playing contact sports. But it’s important to remember a helmet is only capable of protecting the head if it is designed and worn properly.

All Helmets Aren’t Equal

There are many factors that go into the effectiveness of a particular helmet, including the materials and structure of the equipment. That’s why the United States requires helmets to meet rigorous safety standards. These policies regulate not only the amount of force of impact the helmet should be able to sustain, but also what part of the head the helmet should cover. Any alterations made to a helmet may result in a traumatic brain injury in the event of an accident.

Did An Altered Helmet Cause One Man’s TBI?

An article from the International Business Times states experts believe the failure of a helmet that was modified and fitted with a camera may be to blame for the TBI that was suffered by Formula One driver, Michael Schumacher, during a skiing accident earlier this year. Reports indicate the helmet was heavily damaged in the crash, while the camera escaped unscathed.

What You Can Do To Stay Safe

At Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin, we recognize the impact helmets have on reducing the number of serious traumatic brain injuries that occur each year. That’s why we would like to offer these tips to ensure the proper use of this life-saving piece of equipment:

  • Only Use Approved Helmets- All motorcycle helmets should be approved by the Department of Transportation and should be marked with a DOT-Approved sticker. The Consumer Product Safety Commission regulates the safety of helmets used for bicycling, skiing, etc.
  • Ensure Proper Fit- Most helmets should sit across the middle of the forehead. The Chinstrap should secure snuggly beneath the jaw, leaving the helmet with little room for movement.
  • Don’t Compromise Integrity– Altering or modifying a helmet can create a risk of device failure and should be avoided.

Our team of Terre Haute personal injury lawyers is hopeful these tips will help to keep you and your loved ones safe.

Five Facts for Brain Injury Awareness Month

by Staff | March 26th, 2014

The Brain Injury Association of the United States of America states the risks of suffering a brain injury do not discriminate. It can happen to anyone, anytime, and anywhere. That is why the organization is working to raise awareness by naming March Brain Injury Awareness Month.

The Terre Haute Brain Injury Attorneys with Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin would like to share five fast facts about the dangers and risks associated with brain injuries:

  1. An estimated 2.4 million Americans suffer a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) each year, leaving approximately 5.3 million victims experiencing a life-long disability as a result.
  2. Some of the most common causes of TBIs are slip and fall accidents, car crashes, workplace incidents, assaults, military service, and playing sports.
  3. TBI are considered contributing factors in roughly one-third of all injury-related fatalities that occur in the United States.
  4. TBIs cost an average of $76.3 billion per year.
  5. Concussions account for an estimated 75 percent of TBIs that are reported in the United States each year.

Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin and their team of Terre Haute Personal Injury Lawyers are aware of the dangers a brain injury can pose to a victim and are hopeful this information will prove useful to citizens in avoiding and preventing TBIs in the future!

 

Indiana High School Athletes Being Taught About The Dangers Of Traumatic Brain Injuries

by Staff | August 22nd, 2013

August 7, 2013

With school getting back into full swing and many students preparing for the fall season of scholastic sports, parents, coaches, and athletes alike are being reminded of the serious risks a Traumatic Brain Injury can pose.

All Indiana schools must now abide by certain policies regarding the treatment and monitoring of potential brain injuries, like concussions. These policies require that information about brain injuries be distributed amongst coaches, athletes, and their parents. According to an article published by The Kokomo Tribune, all participants and their legal guardians must also sign consent form acknowledging the risks of brain injuries. Furthermore, coaching staff must remove any player exhibiting the signs of a brain injury from play until they receive clearance from a medical specialist.

Football players are also now being trained in practice not to lower their heads when making or taking a tackle in order to reduce the chances of injury. At least 50 players have died as the result to f brain injuries sustained in tackles over the last ten years.

The policy changes came after an increased number of athletes suffering brain injuries were reported, culminating with the serious injury of a Marion High School football player in 2008.

The Terre Haute Personal Injury Lawyers with the law firm of Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin applaud the efforts being made to protect young athletes from the effects of brain injuries. The firm hopes the new regulations reduce the number of brain injuries that occur each year.

Study Examines The Dangers Of Multiple Brain Injuries

by Staff | January 2nd, 2013

January 2, 2012

A case study documented in a recent issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery by researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine highlighted the impact a condition known as Second Impact Syndrome (SIS) can have on the human brain.

The study examined the results of two brain injuries sustained by a 17-year-old football player in Indiana. The young man sustained the first brain injury during a helmet-to-helmet hit with an opposing player during a punt return in a game. He suffered from symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, and trouble seeing, which forced him to seek medical assistance. After doctors performed a CT scan and found normal results, doctors advised the young man not to return to play until his symptoms were gone.

Unfortunately though, the teen returned to play immediately and sustained a second brain injury while participating in practice. Witnesses stated the player had trouble standing and other responses were slow as well. He was then taken to a local hospital where doctor’s determined he was suffering from serious swelling of the brain, resulting in the loss of regulation from SIS.

Researchers point out that SIS often results in patient death and that CT scans may not identify the problem.

The Indiana Disability Lawyers with Fleschner, Stark, Tanoos & Newlin recognize the dangers brain injuries can pose and are here to help you if you have suffered an injury from a blow to the head that was no fault of your own.